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1920 Classic Past Season with transactions and lineups available now!

1920:  Transition, Tragedy, and the Big Bam Theory

by Steve Ehresman

 In 1920, Major League Baseball introduced the so-called “rabbit ball; the Cleveland Indians struggled to overcome the death of their star shortstop Ray Chapman; and the New York Yankees launched an experiment that arguably gave birth to modern baseball.  Having obtained star left-handed pitcher and part-time outfielder Babe Ruth from the financially-strapped Boston Red Sox, the Yankees installed the 6’ 2” 215 pound 1919 home run champion (29 bombs) in their outfield full time, and the rest, as the saying goes, was history.  All the Babe did for his new team was slug 54 home runs, score 156 runs, drive in 137 more, and bat .378, an offensive outburst unprecedented in the annals of early twentieth century baseball.  The Dead Ball Era was over, and the Roaring Twenties had begun. 

The American League of 1920 featured a tight pennant race between the eventual champion Cleveland Indians, the tainted Chicago White Sox, and the hard-charging New York Yankees.  Despite the untimely death of shortstop Ray Chapman, the Indians slipped into the World Series, where they defeated the National League’s representative, the Brooklyn Dodgers, led by star outfielder Zack Wheat and spit-baller Burleigh Grimes.

The 1920 baseball season featured a cast of stars seldom seen in the history of our National Pastime.  In the Junior Circuit, Tris Speaker of the Cleveland Indians, “Shoeless Joe” Jackson and Eddie Collins of the Chicago White Sox, George Sisler of the St. Louis Browns,  and Ty Cobb of the Detroit Tigers provided plenty of offensive fireworks to keep the cranks buzzing.  Over in the less explosive Senior Circuit, the aggressive play of Frankie Frisch of the New York Giants, Ed Roush of the Cincinnati Reds, and Rogers Hornsby of the St. Louis Cardinals helped to make the turnstiles click. 

Superb pitching performances were very much in order in 1920, as ten pitchers recorded 20 or more victories in the American League, while seven hit this magic figure in the National League.  Among these ace hurlers were Jim Bagby of the Cleveland Indians (31-12) and Pete Alexander (27-14) of the Chicago Cubs.

Diamond Mind is proud to introduce our brand-new 1920 baseball season, taking you back to a time when legendary players were shaping the National Game, taking it in a whole new direction.  With our 1920 season, DMB gives you the opportunity to re-live this bygone era and recreate New York’s Big Bam Theory for yourself.         


The 1920 Classic Past Season database contains everything you need to play games using teams and players from the 1920 season -- a full set of ratings and statistics for every player who appeared in the big leagues that year, plus team rosters, manager profiles, ballpark ratings and league schedules. Statistics include official batting, pitching and fielding totals for all batters and pitchers.

Also included is a complete set of real-life player transactions -- trades, disabled list moves, promotions, demotions, suspensions, and more -- plus the actual starting lineups for every regular season game played.

Note: This season database is a companion product for the Diamond Mind Baseball version 11 game. To use this database, you must also have Diamond Mind Baseball version 11. The game software provides you with all of the tools you need to play simulated games, make roster moves, produce dozens of statistical reports, generate league schedules, and more.

1950 Deluxe Past Season with transaction and lineups available now!

1950: Baseball Enters a New Era

by Steve Ehresman

When the 1950s dawned, our nation was on the cusp of dramatic changes in life-style, popular culture, sporting events, and world affairs--all of which would lay the foundation for the world we live in today.  The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (the G.I. Bill) had helped to create a post-World War II era in which more Americans could enjoy a standard of living undreamt of in the 1930s and 1940s. Big gas-guzzling cars, suburban houses, consumer goods, and—of course—babies were booming, as Americans felt confident that the future held nothing but peace and prosperity.

The 1950s were characterized by burgeoning industry, increased take-home pay, and a national mania to own the best gadgets our new-found expendable income could buy.  Television signals could reach almost anywhere in America, creating a shared national experience.  Celebrities such as Bob Hope made appearances on television, thus adding luster to America’s latest entertainment medium.  Soon, sporting events would follow, with Bobby Thompson’s “Shot Heard ‘round the World” becoming the first coast-to-coast television broadcast of a baseball game on October 3, 1951.

In addition to the rise of television, 1950 was the year Charles Schultz published a new comic strip in nine newspapers, introducing America to Charlie Brown in “Li’l Folks” (later “Peanuts”).  Rogers and Hammerstein lit up “The Great White Way” of Broadway, winning the Pulitzer Prize for “South Pacific.”  Building on the success of “Snow White” and “Pinocchio,” Walt Disney debuted another animated feature-length film, “Cinderella.”

Although their impact was still in the future, professional football and basketball had begun jostling for positions in America’s sporting universe.  The National-American Football League decided to shorten its somewhat unwieldy moniker to the more manageable National Football League (NFL).  Thanks to rule changes implemented in January, the NFL opened the way for the 2-platoon system.  Chuck Cooper (the man who integrated professional basketball), Nat “Sweetwater” Clifton, and Earl Lloyd became the first black players in the National Basketball Association.

In the face of this all-American optimism, ominous forces were stirring in the world, setting the stage for conflicts that still resonate in the American consciousness.  Despite grave misgivings by no less a personage than Albert Einstein, President Harry Truman supported development of the hydrogen bomb.  The Israeli Knesset decided that Jerusalem was the capital of the newly-formed State of Israel.  Senator Joseph McCarthy claimed to have a list of 205 communist government employees.  Vietnamese forces led by Ho Chi Minh threatened peace in Southeast Asia.  And, the United States committed combat troops to Korea, as Curt Simmons (17-8, 214.2 innings, 3.40), ace left-hander for the Philadelphia Phillies, was called to active military service in September 1950.

In the volatile world of 1950, baseball promised its own innovations and surprises.  Jackie Robinson signed the highest contract in Brooklyn Dodger history (a whopping $35,000).  On April 18, the first opening night game was played, with the St. Louis Cardinals downing the Pittsburgh Pirates 4-2.  Also on April 18, Sam Jethro (18 home runs, 35 SB, .273), the National League Rookie of the Year, became the first black ball player for the Boston Braves, and the New York Yankees roared from behind, overcoming a 9-0 deficit in the sixth inning, to defeat the Boston Red Sox 15-10, presaging a year of good old-fashioned slugging in the major leagues.

To use an anachronistic term, batters in 1950 simply “raked.”  Billy Goodman of the Boston Red Sox led the American League with a batting average of .354, while Stan “The Man” Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals (41 2B, 28 HR, .346 BA, .596 SLG) paced the National League.  George Kell of the Detroit Tigers compiled the best season of his Hall of Fame career, batting .340 with 218 hits and 56 doubles.

Al Rosen of the Cleveland Indians paced the Junior Circuit with 37 homers, while American League Rookie of the Year Walt Dropo slammed 34 long balls on his way to a .322 average and a league-leading 144 RBI to tie Vern Stephens of the Boston Red Sox.  Over in the National League, Ralph Kiner launched 47 home runs, while Del Ennis of the surprising “Whiz Kid” Philadelphia Phillies accumulated 126 RBI. 

Nevertheless, the 1950 American League season belonged to the Yankees beloved Phil Rizzuto, “The Scooter.”  Outpacing a host of sluggers, including teammate Joe DiMaggio (32 home runs, .301 BA, 122 RBI, .585 SLG), Rizzuto made 735 plate appearances, batted .324, and played a nearly flawless shortstop.

Rizzuto’s MVP counter-part in the National League did not slam long balls.  Rather Jim Konstanty of the Philadelphia closed out games for the pennant-winners.  Combining with Robin Roberts (20-11, 39 starts, 304.1 IP, 21 CG, 5 SHO), Konstanty appeared in a record 74 games, finished 62, saved 22, and posted a sparkling 2.66 ERA in 152 innings, setting the Phillies up to clinch the pennant over the Brooklyn Dodgers on October 1 at Ebbets Field, thanks to a tenth inning 3-run home run by Philadelphia outfielder Dick Sisler.  Konstanty’s year brought national attention to the value of relief pitchers to deliver pennants to their teams.

Although the 1950 Philadelphia Phillies were swept 4-0 in the World Series by the powerful New York Yankees, the grit shown by this version of “The Fightin’ Phils” belongs on the short list of Cinderella teams who made baseball history.

The 1950 baseball season was characterized by superb individual performances.  On the mound, Bob Lemon (23-11, 37 starts, 22 CG, 288 IP) and Early Wynn (18-8, 213.2 IP, 3.20) of the Cleveland Indians, as well as Warren Spahn (21-17, 39 starts, 25 CG, 3.16) of the Boston Braves, added superlatives to their Hall of Fame careers.  At the plate, Larry Doby (25 home runs, .326 BA, .442 OBP) of the Cleveland Indians, Andy Pafko (36 home runs, .304 BA, .591 SLG) of the Chicago Cubs, and Yogi Berra (28 home runs, .322 BA, 124 RBI, .533 SLG) of the New York Yankees supplied fire-power for their respective teams.

This list would not be complete without Ned Garver, toiling in near anonymity with the hapless St. Louis Browns.  Garver (31 GS, 22 CG, 260 IP, 3.39) deserves more than a footnote when one remembers the stars of 1950.

In the new decade, three baseball teams--the Brooklyn Dodgers, the New York Giants, and the New York Yankees--would make New York “The Capital of Baseball.”  For years, their exploits would be celebrated, and the names of their players would read like a “Who’s Who” of Olympians:  Roy Campanella, Gil Hodges, Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, and Duke Snider of the Dodgers; Al Dark, Monte Irvin, Sal Maglie, Eddie Stanky, and Bobby Thompson of the Giants; Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, Whitey Ford, Vic Raschi, and Phil Rizzuto of the Yankees.  If the 1950s started great for baseball, it would only get better when a young slugger from Spavinaw, Oklahoma and a Negro League star from Westfield, Alabama arrived in 1951 to elevate our national game to even greater heights.

For Major League Baseball and its millions of fans, the 1950 season supplied countless thrills and indelible memories.  It showcased peak seasons by players who have long been forgotten.  It highlighted all-star performances by players whose stars have only grown brighter as the years have passed.

As Roger Kahn says in The Era, the 1950s were “the most exciting time for baseball.  You should have been there.”  Now, with Diamond Mind’s updated 1950 season, you CAN be there to celebrate one of the greatest seasons and one of the greatest eras in the annals of our national pastime.


The 1950 Deluxe Past Season database contains everything you need to play games using teams and players from the 1950 season -- a full set of ratings and statistics for every player who appeared in the big leagues that year, plus team rosters, manager profiles, ballpark ratings and league schedules. Statistics include official batting, pitching and fielding totals with left/right splits for all batters and pitchers.

Also included is a complete set of real-life player transactions -- trades, disabled list moves, promotions, demotions, suspensions, and more -- plus the actual starting lineups for every regular season game played.

If you are a registered owner of the 1950 Classic Past Season, you are eligible for upgrade pricing for this item. Send an email to dmb_info@imaginesports.com to request your discount promotion code.

Note: This season database is a companion product for the Diamond Mind Baseball version 11 game. To use this database, you must also have Diamond Mind Baseball version 11. The game software provides you with all of the tools you need to play simulated games, make roster moves, produce dozens of statistical reports, generate league schedules, and more.

2017 Season Database Update

On December 29, 2017, we updated our master copy of the 2017 Annual Season Database to correct a small number of errors that have been reported and confirmed since the initial release. 

To check if your copy of the 2017 season database is up to date, have a look in the Notes tab of the Organizer window with your installed copy of the 2017 season as the active database. If the date of the "2017 Updates" note is 12/29/2017 or later then you have the most up to date version.

 This update includes the following corrections:

Ratings
J.D. Martinez (Comb)    RF:  Av -> Fr
Jake Smolinski (Oak)    LF:  Vg -> No rating


Transactions
Micah Johnson (Atl)     DL:      4/4/2017 -> 4/3/2017
Sean Rodriguez (Atl)    DL:      4/4/2017 -> 4/3/2017
Daniel Winkler (Atl)    DL:      4/4/2017 -> 4/3/2017


Registered owners of the 2017 Annual Season database can request a new installation file that includes these updates by contacting DMB support at dmb_info@imaginesports.com

Since these are relatively minor changes there will not be an update patch. If you have already started your season replay or prepared you league database, your best bet is to make the changes in your existing database yourself. You can do so by following these steps:

To change player ratings:

1. Click View on the game's main menu bar and click Organizer.
2. From the Organizer window, click the Players tab. 
3. Scroll down to the player and click once to select him.
4. Click the Modify button.
5. From the popup menu, click Ratings.
6. Make the suggested changes in the Modify Player window and then click the OK button.




To edit real-life transactions:

1. Click View on the game's main menu bar and click Transactions.
2. Set the options as shown below. 



3. Select one transaction to edit from the list.



4. Click the Modify button.
5. Set the Transaction date and Effective date to the new value and then click the OK button

2017 Annual Season Database available now!

The 2017 Baseball Season: Houston Strong

by Steve Ehresman

The 2017 baseball season was a year of extremes. Long balls, winning streaks, and hurricanes dominated the headlines. Powerhouse franchises struggled in the post-season, while newcomers to October baseball pushed their way to the forefront. Altogether, the 2017 season delivered explosive offense, historic performances, and a feel-good finish for a city in need of heroes.

With National League MVP Giancarlo Stanton (59 HR, 132 RBI), American League Rookie of the Year Aaron Judge (52 HR), J.D. Martinez (45 HR), Khris Davis (43 HR), Joey Gallo (41 HR), Nelson Cruz (39 HR), and National League Rookie of the Year Cody Bellinger (39 HR) blasting away, a record-setting 6,104 long balls were launched in 2017, obliterating the old record of 5,693, set in the 2000 season. In addition, Colorado Rockies teammates Charlie Blackmon (213 hits, 137 runs, 37 home runs, 104 RBI, .331) and Nolan Arenado (187 hits, 100 runs, 37 home runs, 130 RBI, .309) absolutely crushed it, helping to make 2107 a year for the ages.

In addition to heavy hitters, the 2017 season featured stand-out mound performances by Cy Young Award winners Corey Kluber (18-4, 265 strikeouts, 2.25) and Max Scherzer (16-6, 268 Ks, 2.51. Likewise, Clayton Kershaw (18-4, 202 Ks, 2.31) and Justin Verlander (15-8, 219 Ks, 3.36) made contributions that helped put their teams into the Fall Classic

Beyond the avalanche of home runs and strikeouts, the 2017 MLB season featured wild-ride streaks by the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Cleveland Indians. Celebrating their 60th season in Los Angeles, the Dodgers, eventual National League Champions, won 104 games, the most in MLB for 2017; however, on their way to that total, the Dodgers became the only team ever to win 15 of 16 games and to lose 15 of 16 games in the same season. One of the most impressive streaks in MLB history was compiled by the Cleveland Indians who won 22 straight games, setting a new American League mark and coming within 4 games of the overall record of 26 straight games, set by the 1916 New York Giants.

The 2017 season was a year for upstarts, as the Colorado Rockies, the Arizona Diamondbacks, and the Minnesota Twins exceeded expectations and qualified for the post-season. Similarly, in the Bronx the New York Yankees put together a campaign that took them further than spring-time prognosticators had anticipated. On the other hand, the Boston Red Sox, the Cleveland Indians, the Washington Nationals, and the Chicago Cubs, favored by many to boogie down at the Big Dance, succumbed to superior talent in the rarefied October air.

Nevertheless, when the history of the 2017 MLB season is recorded for posterity, one story will stand alone: that of the World Series Champion Houston Astros. In June 2014, Sports Illustrated put George Springer of the Houston Astros on its cover with the headline story “Your 2017 World Series Champs.” Whether SI was lucky or prescient is a discussion best left for the patrons of sports bars. What is beyond question is the excellence of the 2017 Astros. Led by American League MVP Jose Altuve (39 doubles, 24 home runs, 81 RBI, 32 stolen bases, .346), the ‘Stros put together a 101-61 campaign, besting the New York Yankees in a 7-game ALCS and defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in one of the greatest Fall Classics in the long history of autumn baseball. By the way, that George Springer kid was pretty good in 2017, swatting 29 doubles, blasting 34 home runs, driving in 85 runs, batting .283, and winning the MVP for the World Series.

After Hurricane Harvey had devastated Houston only weeks before, the Astros created a legacy that transcends sport and reminds us that even amid despair, dedication, teamwork, and perhaps fate can produce champions when we need them most. As we are reminded in The Sandlot: “Heroes get remembered, but legends never die.” In 2017, the Houston Astros became legends.

 

The 2017 Annual Season Database is Available Now!


This season database is a companion product for the Diamond Mind Baseball version 11 game. To use this database, you must also have Diamond Mind Baseball version 11. The game software provides you with all of the tools you need to play simulated games, make roster moves, produce dozens of statistical reports, generate league schedules, and more.

Note: Two new ballpark image files have been added for the 2017 season, Minute Maid Park (removal of Tal's Hill in center field) and SunTrust Park (opened in 2017). These image files are available for free download from our Park Images page.

DMB Large Order Discounts

Diamond Mind offers significant discounts on large orders of $100, $200, or $300 dollars. To receive your discount, enter one of the following codes in the discount box on the checkout page when you place your order.

R7ICKHCRVQYZ for 10% off orders totalling $100.00 or more.

33BUG2I0B77L for 20% off orders totalling $200.00 or more.

597JPWVE1NSF for 30% off orders totalling $300.00 or more.

Please note that these discounts apply to products for use by a single customer only. They do not apply to orders covering more than one person. For example, a league commissioner cannot earn a 30% discount by placing an order for 24 copies of the current season database for league members.